It features a pad-specific counterweight and two-position side handle for improved control and versatility. Don't undertake a task that you don't feel up to. Wet sanding with a pneumatic air sander. Once its dry, (about 24 hours), hit it with some super fine SP and spray it down with the clear coat. Most importantly, don't rush! wikiHow is a “wiki,” similar to Wikipedia, which means that many of our articles are co-written by multiple authors. Bosch GET75-6N – Best Electric DA Sander for Auto Body Work. Last Updated: September 17, 2019 However, you must ensure the sander comes with variable speed options and the proper attachments, including a variety of polishing pads. This article has been viewed 43,746 times. Variable-Speed Random Orbit Sander delivers high-performance material removal with a powerful 4.5-amp motor. Possibly the most crucial phase of the process is sanding the old paint - which deserves a full 'how to' in itself. We do a test run on some automotive body work using 36 grit and 80 grit sand paper and it proves to be a good buy!http://www.swrnc.com or 972-420-1293\"Porter Cable 6 in. If you are looking … The best course of action is to completely remove the old paint and the primer, exposing bare metal. But the results are peerless and the satisfaction of completing a great paint job is quite a feeling. It also allows dents and imperfections to be repaired and filled without adding further work. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. Although you can use an electric sander for wet sanding, the truth is that air sanders are built for the job. Use them with care and consult the owners manual if you're not sure how to operate them. https://www.bestorbitalsander.com/using-an-orbital-sander-to-polish-your-car To create this article, volunteer authors worked to edit and improve it over time. This is really Griot’s third era orbital so it … I usually paint onto a strip of scrap metal that's primed - that way I have another piece to touch and feel how the paint feels without touching the car. Griot’s Garage 10813STDCRD 6″ – Best for detailed jobs. Power sanders are much faster than hand sanding, and fast is the name of the game in collision repair. References. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. It is commonly found in garages, woodshops, and auto body shops and can be used for buffing and sanding different materials such as wood and metal. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 43,746 times. 1. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. So stop hand sanding and learn to love the “bomb.” Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. This article has been viewed 43,746 times. By using our site, you agree to our. To create this article, volunteer authors worked to edit and improve it over time. wikiHow is a “wiki,” similar to Wikipedia, which means that many of our articles are co-written by multiple authors. This can be used to sand the car down to the bare metal without digging into the metal surface. A dual-action sander oscillates in a way that sands the surface without gouging the metal. % of people told us that this article helped them. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/9\/93\/Sand-a-Car-for-Repainting-Step-1.jpg\/v4-460px-Sand-a-Car-for-Repainting-Step-1.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/9\/93\/Sand-a-Car-for-Repainting-Step-1.jpg\/aid2924859-v4-728px-Sand-a-Car-for-Repainting-Step-1.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":306,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"485","licensing":"

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