Luckily for Bach, and also for Goldberg, the new composition helped to ensure that Kaiserling was out for the count. Date Original publication: 1741; This edition: May 5, 2012 Bach's Goldberg Variations that could be used, shared, and modified as … They’re named as such because a man named Johann Goldberg, a super skilled keyboardist, was likely the first one to perform it. Beatrice Rana's new recording of the Goldberg Variations is out now on Warner. Download all MP3 16-bit VBR £8.99. Variatio 1 a 1 Clav. 6. English: The score of Johann Sebastian Bach's Goldberg Variations, released by the Open Goldberg Variations project. 7. What are the Goldberg Variations? Variatio 4 a 1 Clav. Variatio 3 a 1 Clav. Aria 2. The Goldberg variations were first published in 1741, when Bach about 56 years old (in the last decade of his life). … The Open Goldberg Variations (Johann Sebastian Bach, BWV 988), played by Kimiko Ishizaka, are free to download and share. Bach: "Open" Goldberg Variations, BWV 988 (Piano) by Kimiko Ishizaka, released 28 May 2012 1. Variatio 6 a 1 Clav. Canone all Unisuono 5. The Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, is a musical composition for harpsichord by Johann Sebastian Bach, consisting of an aria and a set of 30 variations.First published in 1741, it is named after Johann Gottlieb Goldberg, who may also have been the first performer of the work. They are governed by the Creative Commons Zero license, which means that they are a part of the public domain, and every use of them is allowed. Its goal was to raise enough money to produce the first high-quality studio recording and score of J.S. Digital booklet (PDF) Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Goldberg Variations Pavel Kolesnikov (piano) Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available. 4. Goldberg Variations: Publication. 3. Variatio 2 a 1 Clav. Variatio 5 a 1 ovvero 2 Clav. The Goldberg Variations were originally written for harpsichord. The Open Goldberg Project began as a crowdfunding project on Kickstarter.com in mid-2011. J.S. For his troubles, Bach was said to have been paid a goblet full of gold Louis d’or. Around 1741, Bach published a long and complicated keyboard piece, calling it Aria with diverse variations for a harpsichord with two manuals (keyboards).